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1 - 18 of 18 Providers
 
AA1 TIGER PAINTING INC
7763 Navajo St, Denver, CO  80221
303-434-3091
 
ART SOURCE INTERNATIONAL
1237 Pearl St, Boulder, CO  80302
303-444-4080
 
BOB PETERSON OLD PHOTO RESTORATION
2560 Hoyt St, Lakewood, CO  80215
303-237-2257
 
CAPANO LISA FINE ARTS RESTORATION
687 Ridgeview Dr, Louisville, CO  80027
720-890-8122
 
COLVIN WILLIAM R
1375 Nmonaco Pkwy, Denver, CO  80220
303-292-1847
 
CONSERVATION OF PAPER PARCHMENT AND PHOTOGRAPHS
1227 Santa Fe Dr, Denver, CO  80204
303-534-3667
 
FINE ART RESTORATION
1375 Nmonaco Pkwy, Denver, CO  80220
303-292-1847
 
MEGAPIXEL DIGITAL IMAGING
2109 Mead Ln, Montrose, CO  81401
970-252-1789
 
MYSTIC STUDIO
2560 Hoyt Dr, Denver, CO  80229
303-237-2257
 
PATRICK KIPPER BRONZE PATINATION
138 12th St SE, Loveland, CO  80537
970-663-3363
 
PETERSON ROBERT W PHOTOG
2560 Hoyt Dr, Denver, CO  80229
303-237-2257
 
PHOTOGRAPHS & MEMORIES
669 S Pearl St, Denver, CO  80209
303-765-0114
 
PLATTE RIVER ART SERVICES
350 Santa Fe Dr, Denver, CO  80223
303-571-1060
 
RENAISSANCE LIGHTING CENTER
312 F St, Salida, CO  81201
719-539-3220
 
SUITABLE FOR FRAMING
210 Abc Ste H, Aspen, CO  81611
970-920-1386
 
TEMPLE KATHERINE
1375 Nmonaco Pkwy, Denver, CO  80220
303-292-1847
 
TUDHOPE PAPER & PHOTOGRAPH CONSERVATION STUDIO
901 E 10th Ave, Denver, CO  80218
303-831-9291
 
WESTERN CENTER FOR THE CONSERVATION OF FINE ARTS
1225 Santa Fe Dr, Denver, CO  80204
303-573-1973
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Related Occupations
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Archivists

Archivists appraise, edit, and maintain permanent records and historically valuable documents. Many perform research on archival material. Show Details

Duties

Archivists typically do the following:

  • Create and maintain accessible computer archives and databases
  • Organize and classify archival records to make it easy to find materials
  • Authenticate and appraise historical documents and archival materials
  • Provide reference services and help for users
  • Direct workers who help arrange, exhibit, and maintain collections
  • Safeguard records by copying to film, videotape, disk, or computer formats
  • Preserve and maintain documents and objects
  • Set and administer policy guidelines concerning public access to materials
  • Locate new materials and direct their acquisition and display

Archivists preserve many documents and records for their importance, potential value, or historical significance. Most archivists coordinate educational and public outreach programs, such as tours, workshops, lectures, and classes. Some work with the boards of institutions to administer plans and policies. In addition, archivists may research topics or items relevant to their collections.

Some archivists specialize in an area of history, such as colonial history, so they can more accurately determine which records in that area should be kept and should become part of the archives. Archivists also may work with specialized forms of records, such as manuscripts, electronic records, websites, photographs, maps, motion pictures, or sound recordings.

Archivists usually use computers to generate and maintain archival records. Professional standards for handling electronic archival records are still evolving. However, computer capabilities will continue to expand and more records will be stored and exhibited electronically, providing both increased access and better protection for archived documents.

Archives technicians help archivists organize, maintain, and provide access to historical documentary materials.

Curators, Museum Technicians, and Conservators

Curators oversee collections, such as artwork and historic items, and may conduct public service activities for an institution. Museum technicians and conservators prepare and restore objects and documents in museum collections and exhibits. Show Details

Duties

Curators, museum technicians, and conservators typically do the following:

  • Acquire, store, and exhibit collections
  • Select the theme and design of exhibits
  • Develop or set up exhibit materials
  • Design, organize, or conduct tours and workshops for the public
  • Attend meetings and civic events to promote the institution
  • Clean objects using cleansers, solvents, and soap solutions
  • Direct and supervise curatorial, technical, and student staff
  • Plan and conduct special research projects

Many objects and documents are important or historically significant. Curators, museum technicians, and conservators preserve and organize the display of these materials.

The following are occupational specialties:

Curators manage museums, zoos, aquariums, botanical gardens, nature centers, and historic sites. The museum director often is a curator. Curators direct the acquisition, storage, and exhibit of collections, including negotiating and authorizing the purchase, sale, exchange, or loan of collections. They also may authenticate, evaluate, and categorize the specimens in a collection.

Curators often oversee and help conduct the institution’s research projects and related educational programs.

Today, an increasing part of a curator’s duties involves fundraising and promotion, which may include writing and reviewing grant proposals, journal articles, and publicity materials. In addition, many curators attend meetings, conventions, and civic events.

Most curators specialize in a particular field, such as botany, art, or history. Those who work in large institutions may be highly specialized. A large natural history museum, for example, might employ separate curators for its collections of birds, fishes, insects, and mammals.

Some curators take care of their collections, some do research related to items in the collection, and others do administrative tasks. In small institutions with only one or a few curators, one curator may be responsible for a number of tasks, from taking care of collections to directing the affairs of the museum.

Museum technicians, commonly known as registrars, help curators by preparing and taking care of museum items. Registrars also may answer questions from the public and help curators and outside scholars use the collections.

Conservators manage, preserve, treat, and document works of art, artifacts, and specimens—work that may require substantial historical, scientific, and archaeological research. Conservators document their findings and treat items to minimize their deterioration or to restore them to their original state.

Conservators usually specialize in a particular material or group of objects, such as documents and books, paintings, decorative arts, textiles, metals, or architectural material. They use x rays, chemical testing, microscopes, special lights, and other laboratory equipment and techniques to examine objects, determine their condition, and decide on the best way to preserve them.

In addition to their conservation work, conservators participate in outreach programs, research topics in their specialty, and write articles for scholarly journals. They may be employed by a museum or other institution that has objects needing conservation, or they may be self-employed and have several clients.

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