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1 - 20 of 23 Providers
platinum
Serving Oakland, Macomb & Wayne Counties
ClaimsPages.com Service Provider since 12/7/2012
888-811-4655
 
A B C CAB
12853 Levan Rd, Livonia, MI  48150
734-591-3888
 
A B C TRANSPORTATION
12853 Levan Rd, Livonia, MI  48150
248-477-5175
 
AMERICAN AMBULANCE SERVICE
1050 Trumbull St, Detroit, MI  48216
313-963-2000
 
BROOKINS TRANSPORTATION
12811 Linwood St, Detroit, MI  48238
313-867-1107
 
BTS TRANSPORTATION SERVICE
8303 Carrie St, Detroit, MI  48211
313-923-4351
 
CAMPHIRE TRANSPORTATION
9616 Bramell, Redford, MI  48239
313-535-2705
 
CAUSE SENIOR & HANDICAP TRANSPORTATION
1712 W Grand Blvd, Detroit, MI  48208
313-897-6500
 
EASTSIDE COMMUNITY RESOURCECENTER
12534 Kelly Rd, Detroit, MI  48224
313-839-0769
 
GODS WAY TRANSPORTATION SERVICE
15468 Mansfield St, Detroit, MI  48227
313-272-2070
 
GOODEN'S VANS TRANSPORTATION
18901 Littlefield St, Detroit, MI  48235
313-862-2789
 
HAVENS SHUTTLE
8261 E Brentwood St, Detroit, MI  48234
313-892-7271
 
JLJ TRANSPORTATION SERVICE
16845 Saint Marys St, Detroit, MI  48235
313-273-8142
 
LORRAINE CAB
15100 W Warren Ave, Dearborn, MI  48126
313-582-6900
 
MEDIC ONE AMBULANCE SERVICE
25911 Northline Rd, Taylor, MI  48180
313-271-9933
 
MOBILE CARE
20765 Tireman St, Detroit, MI  48228
313-436-8219
 
ON BOARD TRANSPORTATION LLC
20140 Schoolcraft, Detroit, MI  48223
313-533-5388
 
ON TIME TRANSPORTAION
1411 E Jefferson Ave, Detroit, MI  48207
313-567-4945
 
QUENCY & AARON'S TRANSPORTATION LLC
18643 Griggs St, Detroit, MI  48221
313-863-8501
 
S & L TRANSPORTATION
6642 Michigan Ave, Detroit, MI  48210
313-897-6200
ADD YOUR BUSINESS LISTING:
Thank you for your interest in becoming listed in the Claims Pages as an Insurance Claims Service Provider in Wayne County, MI under Wheelchair & Handicapped Transportation. Simply fill out the form below and a representative will contact you as soon as possible to discuss advertising rates and options on how to best market your business to the thousands of insurance adjusters in your area. Or, if you have any questions, please call our Claims Provider Hotline at 1-844-CLM-WORK. If you are an adjuster, please call our Adjuster Services Department directly at 1-844-ADJUST1.
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Related Occupations
Powered by The Bureau of Labor Statistics
Bus Drivers

Bus drivers transport people between a variety of places including, work, school, shopping and across state borders. Some drive regular routes, and others transport passengers on chartered trips or sightseeing tours. They drive a range of vehicles, from 15-passenger buses to 60-foot articulated buses (with two connected sections) that can carry more than 100 passengers. Show Details

Duties

Bus drivers typically do the following:

  • Check the bus tires, lights, and oil and do other basic maintenance
  • Pick up and drop off passengers at designated locations
  • Follow a planned route on a time schedule
  • Help disabled passengers get on and off the bus
  • Follow traffic laws and state and federal transit regulations
  • Follow safety procedures to make sure they and all passengers are safe
  • Keep passengers informed of possible delays

The following are examples of types of bus drivers.

Local transit bus drivers follow a daily schedule while transporting people on regular routes along the same city or suburban streets. They usually stop frequently, often only a few blocks apart and when a passenger requests a stop. Local transit drivers typically do the following:

  • Collect bus fares, sometimes making change for passengers
  • Answer questions about schedules, routes, and transfer points
  • Report accidents or other traffic disruptions to a central dispatcher, and follow directions when using an alternate route

Intercity bus drivers transport passengers between cities or towns, sometimes crossing state lines. They may travel between distant cities or between towns only a few miles apart. They usually pick up and drop off passengers at bus stations, where passengers buy tickets. Increasingly, intercity buses are using curbside locations in downtown urban areas instead of stations. Intercity drivers typically do the following:

  • Ensure all passengers have a valid ticket to ride the bus
  • May sell tickets to passengers when there are unsold seats available
  • Follow a central dispatcherís instruction when taking an alternate route
  • Help passengers load or unload baggage

Motor coach drivers transport passengers on charted trips or sightseeing tours. Their schedule and route are generally arranged by a trip planner for the convenience of the passengers, who often are on vacation. Motor coach drivers are usually away for long periods of time because they usually stay with vacationers for the length of the trip. Motor coach drivers typically do the following:

  • Listen to and sometimes address passenger complaints
  • Ensure the tour stays on schedule
  • Sometimes act as tour guides for passengers
  • Help passengers load or unload baggage
  • Account for all passengers before leaving a location

School bus drivers transport students to and from school and other activities. On school days, drivers pick up students in the morning and return them home or to the designated bus stop in the afternoon. School bus drivers also drive students to field trips, sporting events, and other activities. Some drivers work at school in other occupations, such as janitors, cafeteria workers, or mechanics, between morning and afternoon trips. School bus drivers typically do the following:

  • Watch traffic and people carefully to ensure the safety of children getting on and off the bus
  • Take care of the needs of children with disabilities
  • Keep order and safety on the school bus
  • Understand and enforce the school systemís rules regarding student conduct
  • Report disciplinary problems to the school district or parents
Social and Human Service Assistants

Social and human service assistants help people get through difficult times or get additional support. They help other workers, such as social workers, and they help clients find benefits or community services. Show Details

Duties

Social and human service assistants typically do the following:

  • Work under the direction of social workers, psychologists, or others who have more education or experience
  • Help determine what type of help their clients need
  • Work with clients and other professionals, such as social workers, to develop a treatment plan
  • Help clients get help with daily activities, such as eating and bathing
  • Coordinate services provided to clients by their or other organizations
  • Research services available to their clients in their communities
  • Determine clientsí eligibility for services such as food stamps and Medicaid
  • Help clients complete paperwork to apply for assistance programs
  • Monitor clients to ensure services are provided appropriately

Social and human service assistants have many job titles, including case work aide, clinical social work aide, family service assistant, social work assistant, addictions counselor assistant, and human service worker. They serve diverse populations with a range of problems. Their work varies, depending on the clients they serve.

With children and families, social and human service assistants ensure that children live in safe homes. They help parents get the resources, such as food stamps or childcare, they need to care for their children.

With the elderly, workers help clients stay in their own homes and under their own care whenever possible. They coordinate meal deliveries or find personal care aides to help older people with day-to-day needs, such as doing errands or bathing. In some cases, human service workers help look for residential care facilities, such as nursing homes.

For people with disabilities, social and human service assistants help find rehabilitation services that aid their clients. They may work with employers to adapt positions to make them accessible to people with disabilities. Some workers find personal care services to help clients with daily living activities, such as bathing or making meals.

For people with addictions, human service assistants find rehabilitation centers that meet their clientsí needs. They also find support groups or twelve-step programs. They work with people who are dependent on alcohol, drugs, gambling, or other substances or behaviors.

With veterans, assistants help people discharged from the military adjust to civilian life. They help with practical needs, such as finding housing and applying skills gained in the military to civilian jobs. They also help with navigating the overwhelming number of services available to veterans.

For people with mental illnesses, social and human service assistants help clients find resources to cope with their illness. They find self-help and support groups to provide their clients with an assistance network. In addition, they help those with more severe mental illnesses care for themselves by finding personal care services or group housing.

With immigrants, workers help clients adjust to living in a new country. They help clients locate jobs and housing. They also may help clients find programs that teach English, or they may find legal assistance to help immigrants get their paperwork in order.

With former prison inmates, human service assistants help clients re-enter society by finding job training or placement programs. Human service assistants help former inmates find housing and connect with programs that help them make a new life for themselves.

With homeless people, assistants help clients meet their basic needs. They find temporary or permanent housing. They find places, such as soup kitchens, that provide meals. Human service assistants also help homeless people find facilities for other problems they may have, such as joblessness.

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