Search locations by city, county or zip in
the box below or browse NE counties:
Search categories by keywords and phrases
in the box below or browse all by filter:
Nebraska Digital Imaging by County
Sarpy (1)
Digital Imaging by State
Related Occupations
Powered by The Bureau of Labor Statistics
Archivists

Archivists appraise, edit, and maintain permanent records and historically valuable documents. Many perform research on archival material. Show Details

Duties

Archivists typically do the following:

  • Create and maintain accessible computer archives and databases
  • Organize and classify archival records to make it easy to find materials
  • Authenticate and appraise historical documents and archival materials
  • Provide reference services and help for users
  • Direct workers who help arrange, exhibit, and maintain collections
  • Safeguard records by copying to film, videotape, disk, or computer formats
  • Preserve and maintain documents and objects
  • Set and administer policy guidelines concerning public access to materials
  • Locate new materials and direct their acquisition and display

Archivists preserve many documents and records for their importance, potential value, or historical significance. Most archivists coordinate educational and public outreach programs, such as tours, workshops, lectures, and classes. Some work with the boards of institutions to administer plans and policies. In addition, archivists may research topics or items relevant to their collections.

Some archivists specialize in an area of history, such as colonial history, so they can more accurately determine which records in that area should be kept and should become part of the archives. Archivists also may work with specialized forms of records, such as manuscripts, electronic records, websites, photographs, maps, motion pictures, or sound recordings.

Archivists usually use computers to generate and maintain archival records. Professional standards for handling electronic archival records are still evolving. However, computer capabilities will continue to expand and more records will be stored and exhibited electronically, providing both increased access and better protection for archived documents.

Archives technicians help archivists organize, maintain, and provide access to historical documentary materials.

Computer Support Specialists

Computer support specialists provide help and advice to people and organizations using computer software or equipment. Some, called technical support specialists, support information technology (IT) employees within their organization. Others, called help-desk technicians, assist non-IT users who are having computer problems. Show Details

Duties

Technical support specialists typically do the following:

  • Test and evaluate existing network systems
  • Perform regular maintenance to ensure that networks operate correctly
  • Troubleshoot local area networks (LANs), wide area networks (WANs), and Internet systems

Technical support specialists, also called computer network support specialists, usually work in their organizationís IT department. They help IT staff analyze, troubleshoot, and evaluate computer network problems. They play an important role in the daily upkeep of their organizationís networks by finding solutions to problems as they occur. Solving an IT problem in a timely manner is important because organizations depend on their computer systems. Technical support specialists may provide assistance to the organizationís computer users through phone, email, or in-person visits. They often work under network and computer systems administrators, who handle more complex tasks. For more information, see the profile on network and computer systems administrators.

Help-desk technicians typically do the following:

  • Pay attention to customers when they describe their computer problems
  • Ask customers questions to properly diagnose the problem
  • Walk customers through the problem-solving steps
  • Set up or repair computer equipment and related devices
  • Train users to use new computer hardware or software, including printing, installation, word processing, and email
  • Give information to others in the organization about what gives customers the most trouble and other concerns customers have

Help-desk technicians, also called computer user support specialists, usually provide technical help to non-IT computer users. They respond to phone and email requests for help. Sometimes they make site visits so that they can solve a problem in person.

Help-desk technicians may solve a range of problems that vary with the industry and the particular firm. Some technicians work for large software companies and for support service firms and must give instructions to business customers on how to use complex programs. Others work in call centers answering simpler questions from consumers. Some technicians work for organizations and help non-IT workers with their computer problems.

Desktop Publishers

Desktop publishers use computer software to design page layouts for newspapers, books, brochures, and other items to be printed or put online. They collect the text, graphics, and other materials they will need and format them into a finished product. Show Details

Duties

Desktop publishers typically do the following:

  • Gather existing materials or work with designers and writers to create new artwork or text
  • Find and edit graphics, such as photographs or illustrations
  • Use scanners to turn drawings and other materials into digital images
  • Import text and graphics into desktop publishing software programs
  • Position artwork and text on the page layout
  • Select formatting properties, such as text size, column width, and spacing
  • Check proofs, or preliminary layouts, for errors and make corrections
  • Convert files for printing or websites
  • Send final files to a commercial printer or print the documents on a high-resolution printer

Desktop publishers use publishing software to create page layouts for print or web publication. Some desktop publishers may help to create web pages using Hypertext Markup Language (HTML), although this is usually the job of web designers. For more information on workers who design, create, and modify websites, see the profile on information security analysts, web developers, and computer network architects.†

Desktop publishers work with other design and media professionals, such as writers, editors and graphic designers. For example, desktop publishers work with graphic designers to come up with images that complement the text and fit the available space.† †

In addition to designing pages, desktop publishers may edit or write text. Some desktop publishers might be responsible for correcting spelling, punctuation, and grammar or for writing original content themselves.

Desktop publishersí responsibilities may vary widely from project to project and employer to employer. Smaller firms typically use desktop publishers to perform a wide range of tasks, while desktop publishers at larger firms may specialize in one part of the publishing process.

Active Users: 2332
WEBSERVER 1