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1 - 20 of 197 Providers
 
A WELL-BORN GUIDE HAVE PHD WILL TRAVEL
PO Box 1601, Santa Fe, NM  87504
505-988-8022
 
ALAMOGORDO MEDIATION CTR
1019 N Florida Avenue Ste C, Alamogordo, NM  88310
505-434-3441
 
ANDERSON WILLIAM R. ATTORNEY
2951 Roadrunner Pkwy, Las Cruces, NM  88011
505-522-7500
 
ANTHONY B. JEFFRIES
1424 Aliso NE, Albuquerque, NM  87110
505-242-4040
 
ANUSKEWICZ ROY A JR ATTORNEY
1000 Lomas Blvd NW, Albuquerque, NM  87102
505-255-0600
 
APODACA LILLIAN G. ATTORNEY
3908 Carlisle Blvd NE, Albuquerque, NM  87107
505-881-4545
 
ARBITRATION ASSOC LLC
3900 Juan Tabo Blvd NE, Albuquerque, NM  87111
505-299-0345
 
ARLAND WILLIAM J. III ATTORNEY
315 Paseo de Peralta, Santa Fe, NM  87501
505-954-3900
 
ATKINSON & KELSEY P.A.
2155 Louisiana Blvd NE Ste 2000, Albuquerque, NM  87110
505-883-3070
 
BANNERMAN & WILLIAMS P.A.
2201 San Pedro NE Building 2 Ste 207, Albuquerque, NM  87110
505-837-1900
 
BARNES JULIA HOSFORD MEDIATOR ATTORNEY
200 W De Vargas St, Santa Fe, NM  87501
505-982-3993
 
BAUMAN DOW & LEÓN P.C.
7309 Indian School Rd NE, Albuquerque, NM  87110
505-883-3191
 
BECKER LESLIE JD
1000 Lomas Blvd NW, Albuquerque, NM  87102
505-255-0600
 
BENNETT MARK & ASSOC
1435 Santa Cruz Dr, Santa Fe, NM  87505
505-984-2251
 
BERKOWITZ LAWRENCE M. ATTORNEY
630 Paseo del Pueblo Sur Ste 155C, Taos, NM  87571
505-758-3848
 
BIEDSCHEID BRYAN P. ATTORNEY
708 Paseo de Peralta, Santa Fe, NM  87501
505-988-1668
 
BILLINGS M LYNN ATTORNEY
826 Pueblo Solano Rd NW, Albuquerque, NM  87107
505-344-5650
 
BINGHAM HURST APODACA & WILE P.C.
3908 Carlisle Blvd NE, Albuquerque, NM  87107
505-881-4545
 
BODY MIND AWARENESS PC
1919 5th St Ste D, Santa Fe, NM  87505
505-438-3344
 
BRIAN E. FITZGERALD
644 Don Gaspar, Santa Fe, NM  87505
505-995-8864
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Related Occupations
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Judges, Mediators, and Hearing Officers

Judges, mediators, and hearing officers apply the law to court cases and oversee the legal process in courts. They also resolve administrative disputes and facilitate negotiations between opposing parties. Show Details

Duties

Judges, mediators, and hearing officers typically do the following:

  • Research legal issues
  • Read and evaluate information from documents such as motions, claim applications, or records
  • Preside over hearings and listen to or read arguments by opposing parties
  • Determine if the information presented supports the charge, claim, or dispute
  • Decide if the procedure is being conducted according to the rules and law
  • Analyze, research, and apply laws, regulations, or precedents to reach judgments, conclusions, or agreements
  • Write opinions, decisions, or instructions regarding the case, claim, or dispute

Judges commonly preside over trials or hearings of cases regarding nearly every aspect of society, from individual traffic offenses to issues concerning the rights of large corporations. Judges listen to arguments and determine whether the evidence presented deserves a trial. In criminal cases, judges may decide that people charged with crimes should be held in jail until the trial, or they may set conditions for their release. They also approve search and arrest warrants.

Judges interpret the law to determine how a trial will proceed, which is particularly important when unusual circumstances arise for which standard procedures have not been established. They ensure that hearings and trials are conducted fairly and the legal rights of all involved parties are protected.

In trials in which juries are selected to decide the case, judges instruct jurors on applicable laws and direct them to consider the facts from the evidence. For other trials, judges decide the case. A judge who determines guilt in criminal cases may impose a sentence or penalty on the guilty party. In civil cases, the judge may award relief, such as compensation for damages, to the parties who win the lawsuit.

Some judges, such as appellate court judges, review decisions and records made by lower courts, and make decisions based on lawyers’ written and oral arguments.

Judges use various forms of technology, such as electronic databases and software, to manage cases and prepare for trials. In some cases, a judge also may manage the court’s administrative and clerical staff.

The following are examples of types of judges, mediators, and hearing officers:

Judges, magistrate judges, and magistrates preside over trials or hearings. They typically work in local, state, and federal courts.

In local and state court systems, they have a variety of titles, such as municipal court judge, county court judge, magistrate, and justice of the peace. Traffic violations, misdemeanors, small-claims cases, and pretrial hearings make up the bulk of these judges' work.

In federal and state court systems, general trial court judges have authority over any case in their system. Appellate court judges rule on a small number of cases by reviewing decisions of the lower courts and lawyers’ written and oral arguments.

Hearing officers, also known as administrative law judges or adjudicators, usually work for government agencies. They decide many issues, such as if a person is eligible for workers' compensation benefits, or if employment discrimination occurred.

Arbitrators, mediators, or conciliators help opposing parties settle disputes outside of court. They hold private, confidential hearings, which are less formal than a court trial.  

Arbitrators are usually attorneys or business people with expertise in a particular field. They hear and decide disputes between opposing parties as an impartial third party. When arbitration is required, if one side is not happy with the decision, they can still take the matter to court. Arbitration may also be voluntary, in which the opposing sides agree that whatever the arbitrator decides will be a final, binding decision.

Mediators are neutral parties who help people resolve their disputes. Mediators suggest solutions, but they do not make binding decisions. If the opposing sides cannot reach a settlement with the mediator's help, they are free to pursue other options.

Conciliators are similar to mediators. Their role is to help guide opposing sides to a settlement. The opposing sides must decide in advance if they will be bound by the conciliator's recommendations.

Lawyers

Lawyers advise and represent individuals, businesses, or government agencies on legal issues or disputes.  Show Details

Duties

Lawyers typically do the following:

  • Advise and represent clients in courts, before government agencies, or in private legal matters
  • Communicate with their clients and others
  • Conduct research and analysis of legal problems
  • Interpret laws, rulings, and regulations for individuals and businesses
  • Present facts in writing or verbally to their clients or others and argue on their behalf
  • Prepare and file legal documents, such as lawsuits, appeals, wills, contracts, and deeds

Lawyers, also called attorneys, act as both advocates and advisors.

As advocates, they represent one of the parties in criminal and civil trials by presenting evidence and arguing in court to support their client.

As advisors, lawyers counsel their clients about their legal rights and obligations and suggest courses of action in business and personal matters. All attorneys research the intent of laws and judicial decisions and apply the laws to the specific circumstances that their clients face. 

To prepare for cases more efficiently, lawyers increasingly use the Internet, online legal databases, and virtual law libraries. Lawyers also often oversee the work of support staff, such as paralegals and legal assistants. For more information about legal support staff, see the profile on paralegals and legal assistants.

Lawyers may have different titles and different duties, depending on where they work.

Criminal law attorneys are also known as prosecutors or defense attorneys. Prosecutors work for the government to file a lawsuit, or charge, against an individual or corporation accused of violating the law.

Defense attorneys work for either individuals or the government (as public defenders) to represent, or defend, the accused.

Government counsels commonly work in government agencies. They write and interpret laws and regulations and set up procedures to enforce them. Government counsels also write legal reviews on agencies' decisions. They argue civil and criminal cases on behalf of the government.

Corporate counsels, also called in-house counsels, are lawyers who work for corporations. They advise a corporation's executives about legal issues related to the corporation's business activities. These issues might involve patents, government regulations, contracts with other companies, property interests, taxes, or collective-bargaining agreements with unions.

Legal aid lawyers work for private, nonprofit organizations for disadvantaged people. They generally handle civil cases, such as those about leases, job discrimination, and wage disputes, rather than criminal cases.

Lawyers often specialize in a particular area. The following are some examples of types of lawyers:

Environmental lawyers deal with issues and regulations that are related to the environment. They might represent advocacy groups, waste disposal companies, or government agencies to make sure they comply with the relevant laws.

Tax lawyers handle a variety of tax-related issues for individuals and corporations. Tax lawyers may help clients navigate complex tax regulations so that they pay the appropriate tax on income, profits, property, and so on. For example, they might advise a corporation on how much tax it needs to pay from profits made in different states to comply with the Internal Revenue Service’s (IRS) rules.

Intellectual property lawyers deal with the laws related to inventions, patents, trademarks, and creative works such as music, books, and movies. An intellectual property lawyer might advise a client about whether it is okay to use published material in the client’s forthcoming book.

Family lawyers handle a variety of legal issues that pertain to the family. They may advise clients regarding divorce, child custody, and adoption proceedings.

Securities lawyers work on legal issues arising from the buying and sell of stocks, ensuring that all disclosure requirements are met. They may advise corporations that are interested in listing in the stock exchange through an initial public offering (IPO) or buying shares in another corporation.

Litigation lawyers handle all lawsuits and disputes between parties. These could be contract disputes, personal injury disputes, or real estate and property disputes. Litigation lawyers may specialize in a certain area, such as personal injury law, or may be a general lawyer for all types of disputes and lawsuits.

Some attorneys become teachers in law schools. For more information on law school professors, see the profile on postsecondary teachers.

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