1-800-Boardup of South Jersey

(800) 262-7387

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Addresses Found 10020 E Knox Ave, Spokane Valley, WA 99206 1009 W 13th St, Vancouver, WA 98660 102 Innovation Way, Colona, IL 61241 10416 New Berlin Rd, Jacksonville, FL 32226 112 E Albert St, Maize, KS 67101 114 Industrial Dr, Gilberts, IL 60136 114 Twenty Nine Ct, Williamston, SC 29697 116 Majestic Way Ct, Kernersville, NC 27284 12001 W Dearbourn Ave, Wauwatosa, WI 53226 1206 W Avenue O, Belton, TX 76513 12137 Valliant St, San Antonio, TX 78216 12145 Centron Pl, Cincinnati, OH 45246 1235 Abbottstown Pike, Hanover, PA 17331 1300 Michigan Ave, Waterville, OH 43566 13482 N Wheaton Rd, Grand Ledge, MI 48837 13701 Green Ash Ct, Earth City, MO 63045 13821 Harrison St, Blue Island, IL 60406 13909 NE Airport Way, Portland, OR 97230 14709 Bristol Park Blvd, Edmond, OK 73013 1520 S Powerline Rd, Deerfield Beach, FL 33442 15314 Alexander Rd, Alexander, AR 72002 1559 S Novato Blvd Ste C1, Novato, CA 94947 174 Bradley Branch Rd, Arden, NC 28704 175 Carnes Dr, Fayetteville, GA 30214 1830 Airport Exchange Blvd, Erlanger, KY 41018 1837 Terminal Dr, Richland, WA 99354 1897 Thomas Rd, Memphis, TN 38134 1919 S Michigan St, South Bend, IN 46613 1940 Merriam Ln, Kansas City, KS 66106 21300 Ridgetop Cir, Sterling, VA 20166 21515 Bents Ct NE, Aurora, OR 97002 2207 Muriel Ct, Joliet, IL 60433 2219 W Melinda Ln, Phoenix, AZ 85027 2241 Ampere Dr, Louisville, KY 40299 229 Lake Dr, Newark, DE 19702 2300 4th St, Tucker, GA 30084 23110 State Road 54, Lutz, FL 33549 2511 Garden Rd, Monterey, CA 93940 25200 Governor Stockley Rd, Georgetown, DE 19947 2760 Us Highway 80, Bloomingdale, GA 31302 2777 Sherman Blvd, Fort Wayne, IN 46808 28120 Hunters Ridge Blvd, Bonita Springs, FL 34135 28400 Schoolcraft Rd, Livonia, MI 48150 290 Heritage Ave, Portsmouth, NH 03801 2920 E White Star Ave, Anaheim, CA 92806 2933 S Miami Blvd, Durham, NC 27703 3150 SE Gateway Dr, Grimes, IA 50111 3200 Squibb Ave, Rolling Meadows, IL 60008 327 S Kings Rd, Nampa, ID 83687 3374 Lawrenceville Suwanee Rd, Suwanee, GA 30024 340 Interstate Blvd, Greenville, SC 29615 3400 Girard Blvd NE, Albuquerque, NM 87107 3401 Park Ave W, Ontario, OH 44906 3443 Durahart St, Riverside, CA 92507 3466 E 20th N, Idaho Falls, ID 83401 3500 Confederate Rd Ste C, El Paso, TX 79936 3503 S Norton Ave, Sioux Falls, SD 57105 3520 Parkway Ln, Hilliard, OH 43026 407 S Anderson St, Tullahoma, TN 37388 41 Twosome Dr, Moorestown, NJ 08057 4320 S 131st Pl, Tukwila, WA 98168 4380 N 21st St, Ozark, MO 65721 4415 Yeager Way, Bakersfield, CA 93313 4583 Manufacturing Ave, Cleveland, OH 44135 46 Sherwood Ter, Lake Bluff, IL 60044 4800 Sirus Ln, Charlotte, NC 28208 4825 Derry St, Harrisburg, PA 17111 489 Myrtle Ridge Dr, Conway, SC 29526 50 Artisan Means Way, Reno, NV 89511 5121 Bowden Rd, Jacksonville, FL 32216 535 New Jersey St, Redlands, CA 92373 5433 W Crenshaw St, Tampa, FL 33634 6 Commerce Way, Carver, MA 02330 6250 Mckinley St NW, Ramsey, MN 55303 7 Applegate Cir, Round Rock, TX 78665 7100 Tpc Dr, Orlando, FL 32822 72104 Corporate Way, Thousand Palms, CA 92276 7316 Siemens Rd, Wendell, NC 27591 733 Shotwell St, San Francisco, CA 94110 754 Roble Rd, Allentown, PA 18109 7629 Southrail Rd, North Charleston, SC 29420 799 W Marinette Ave, Exeter, CA 93221 8010 E 38th St, Indianapolis, IN 46226 820 Sunpark Dr, Fenton, MO 63026 8204 N Lamar Blvd, Austin, TX 78753 8347 Ohio River Blvd, Pittsburgh, PA 15202 870 Robinson Dr, North Salt Lake, UT 84054 8872 Fallbrook Dr, Houston, TX 77064 9060 Activity Rd, San Diego, CA 92126 909 Executive Ct, Chesapeake, VA 23320 9202 Barton St, Overland Park, KS 66214 9618 Midvale Ave N, Seattle, WA 98103 9855 S 140th St, Omaha, NE 68138
Matching Phone 1-800-Boardup 1-800-Boardup of Central Arkansas 1-800-Boardup of Delaware 1-800-Boardup of Greater Pittsburgh, PA 1-800-Boardup of Kansas City Metro 1-800-Boardup of Michigan 1-800-Boardup of NW Ohio 1-800-Boardup of Portland & Southwest Washington 1-800-Boardup of San Diego 1-800-Boardup of Southwest Florida 1-800-Boardup of the Triangle 1-800-Boardup of Western Chicagoland 1-800-Boardup of Austin Metro 1-800-Boardup of Clark County 1-800-Boardup of Exeter 1-800-Boardup of Inland Empire 1-800-Boardup of Memphis 1-800-Boardup of Northeast Florida 1-800-Boardup of Palm Springs 1-800-Boardup of Salem 1-800-Boardup of South Florida 1-800-Boardup of SW Missouri 1-800-Boardup of Virginia Beach 1-800-Boardup of Albuquerque 1-800-Boardup of Central Indiana 1-800-Boardup of Delaware Beaches 1-800-Boardup of Greenville and Spartanburg 1-800-Boardup of Kern County 1-800-Boardup of Monterey 1-800-Boardup of Oklahoma City 1-800-Boardup of Raleigh 1-800-Boardup of San Francisco Peninsula 1-800-Boardup of Southwest Suburbs of Chicago 1-800-Boardup of Treasure Valley 1-800-Boardup of Wichita 1-800-Boardup of Allentown 1-800-Boardup of Charleston 1-800-Boardup of East Idaho 1-800-Boardup of Grimes 1-800-Boardup of Los Angeles 1-800-Boardup of Myrtle Beach 1-800-Boardup of Olympic Peninsula 1-800-Boardup of Reno Metro 1-800-Boardup of Seattle 1-800-Boardup of Spokane/Coeur D'alene 1-800-Boardup of Tullahoma 1-800-Boardup of Winston-Salem 1-800-Boardup of Atlanta 1-800-Boardup of Cincinnati 1-800-BOARDUP Of EL Paso 1-800-Boardup of Houston 1-800-Boardup of Mansfield 1-800-Boardup of North Florida 1-800-Boardup of Orlando Metro 1-800-Boardup of Rolling Meadows 1-800-Boardup of South Central Pennsylvania 1-800-Boardup of St. Louis East/West 1-800-Boardup of Upstate SC 1-800-Boardup of Asheville 1-800-Boardup of Charlotte Metro 1-800-Boardup of Eastern Washington 1-800-Boardup of Harrisburg and York 1-800-Boardup of Louisville Metro 1-800-Boardup of North Central Texas 1-800-Boardup of Omaha 1-800-Boardup of Riverside Metro 1-800-Boardup of Sioux Falls Metro 1-800-Boardup of St. Louis 1-800-Boardup of Twin Cities 1-800-Boardup 1-800 Boardup of Lake Bluff 1-800-Boardup of Carver 1-800-Boardup of Colona 1-800-Boardup of Fort Wayne 1-800-Boardup of Kansas City 1-800-Boardup of Michiana 1-800-Boardup of Northern Kentucky 1-800-Boardup of Pooler 1-800-Boardup of San Antonio Metro 1-800-Boardup of Southwest Atlanta 1-800-Boardup of the Seacoast 1-800-Boardup of West Central Florida 1-800 Board Up 1-800-Boardup of Belton Metro 1-800-Boardup of Cleveland 1-800-Boardup of Fairfax Metro 1-800-Boardup of Joliet 1-800-Boardup of Metro Detroit 1-800-Boardup of Northeast Georgia 1-800-Boardup of Phoenix 1-800-Boardup of Salt Lake City 1-800-Boardup of Tampa Metro 1-800-Boardup of Wauwatosa
Matching Address Apc Contracting (717) 564-4202 BELFOR Property Restoration (813) 386-3473 BELFOR Property Restoration (843) 767-0711 BELFOR Property Restoration (913) 371-8200 Belfor USA Group (801) 936-1212 C & Z Construction (717) 564-5038 CW Test (717) 637-5971 Elite Energy Savers (661) 396-9970 G.S. Jones Restoration Consulting (412) 866-1056 Granite Construciton Co of CA (407) 813-1000 Idc Fire and Water Restoration Williamson (864) 841-5300 Landmark Construction General Contractor, Inc. (901) 452-0390 Northwest Restoration (503) 300-1006 Phoenix Restoration (405) 844-7700 Rebuildex (888) 732-8453 Reliabuild (760) 343-3366 River City Contractors of Arkansas (501) 455-2200 Scotco Construction (509) 943-7584 Skyline Restoration Inc. (708) 629-0563 1800 Packouts (405) 607-6284 1-800-Boardup (800) 262-7387 Ameri Pro Restoration (517) 622-3377 ATI Restoration (216) 267-8330 Atlas Restoration Specialists, Inc. (314) 822-0090 Belfor (734) 261-7764 Belfor Inrecon (757) 547-9400 BELFOR Property Restoration (210) 399-3315 BELFOR Property Restoration (254) 939-1468 BELFOR Property Restoration (757) 547-9400 BELFOR Property Restoration (770) 939-0128 Belfor Property Restoration (858) 847-9886 BELFOR Property Restoration (919) 789-8510 BELFOR Property Restoration (951) 682-7000 Belfor Usa (254) 939-1468 Belfor USA (502) 893-7059 Belfor USA Group (206) 632-0800 Colonial Services Inc (502) 893-7059 CREW Construction & Restoration (605) 965-2727 First Priority Restoration (800) 282-1616 Greenleaf Construction (912) 988-7163 Homeland Restoration Network (317) 536-1191 IDC Fire and Water Restoration Suwanee (678) 546-0313 J & R Contracting Company Inc (419) 878-8550 Kennedy Restoration (503) 234-0509 Landmark Construction & Emergency Services (901) 452-0390 Midwest Remediation (317) 826-0940 North West Restoration (509) 946-9766 Padgett's Cleaning & Restoration, Inc. (909) 307-2769 Property Plus - Water and Fire Damage Restoration (864) 999-0722 Protechs Inc. (260) 471-3165 PuroClean Restoration Services (605) 965-2727 Restore4U (515) 986-4442 Roth Construction Company (216) 267-8330 SERVPRO of Leawood/ Overland Park (913) 381-6550 Shambaugh Carpet Service (419) 529-6422 Shambaugh Cleaning & Restoration (844) 783-6316 Stover's Restoration (316) 722-5005 Sunrise Cleaning & Restoration (208) 529-4762 The Sergio Corporation (574) 288-0500 Tobin Restoration Services of Idaho Falls (208) 523-1080 United Services (314) 298-2701 United Services Restoration & Remodeling (515) 986-4442 Vines Restoration / Plumbing / HVAC (843) 462-2463 Werner Restoration Services Inc (309) 792-0912 Weston American (314) 298-2701 Allied Roofing & Exteriors (314) 752-7273 Professional Roof Service (302) 731-5770 Rooftech (813) 985-0841 Titan Roofing (405) 463-3311 Asbestos & Mold Solutions (509) 943-1104 Damage Recovery Restoration (813) 733-8943 First Response (574) 288-0500 First Response (800) 909-5592 SERVPRO of South Austin,Pflugerville, North & East Williamson County (512) 301-7765 Vines Plumbing (843) 251-2540 Nordic Services Inc (206) 522-9570 PRO Mechanical Service (951) 781-8733 Onyx Outdoors Corp. (813) 610-2376 Air Oasis (904) 425-1357 Arrow Service Center (512) 832-1000 Sears Home Improvement (856) 505-3110 Consolidated Electronic Resources (919) 321-0004 S & C Electric Company (407) 856-9600 Sanford Electrical Contracting (512) 873-7675 Bear Restoration (505) 888-1164 BELFOR Property Restoration (714) 632-7685 Belfor USA (801) 936-1212 Eberts Properties (605) 339-2382 GRG Ventures Inc (904) 219-0635 Grizzly Construction (661) 831-8886 Repairs Unlimited, Inc. (913) 262-6937 Roth Construction (614) 777-4177 A & S Air Conditioning & Heating Inc (813) 949-2453 Accent Precision Wood Products (763) 427-1200 Action 9-A (904) 696-9191 Air Oasis (904) 410-8333 Allied Roofing & Exteriors, INC. (314) 219-1124 Basement Restoration Tech (513) 823-4030 Bear Carpet Inc. (505) 514-0683 Care Property Service (717) 688-3496 Carpet Barn Inc Flooring Center (919) 365-6506 Carpet Source (502) 266-9440 Cole Raymond D Mech Engineer (831) 649-8000 Colonial Services Inc (502) 240-0158 Designing FL Website Design (813) 474-0072 Devin Financial Group (831) 647-8445 Directlink Courier INC (919) 806-2478 Fraud Investigations (904) 828-0079 H&R Block (317) 897-0337 HomeStory Doors of Marin (415) 599-2401 Mark of Excellence INC (813) 871-3473 MFM Services LLC (904) 240-1345 Omnicon Inc (815) 722-5796 Palau True Value (503) 678-2065 Penske Truck Rental (904) 714-0424 Sears Carpet & Upholstery Care (316) 636-5010 Sears Carpet & Upholstery Care (904) 230-7991 Sergio Corporation (574) 234-0443 Teasdale Fenton Restoration (866) 307-0504 Total Restoration Service (254) 791-3473 Video Care & Repair (336) 632-8855 Belfor Louisville (502) 893-7059 1-800-Boardup (800) 262-7387 Alert Disaster Restoration (661) 396-7908 Ameri Pro Restoration (517) 622-3377 Asbestos & Mold Solutions (509) 943-1104 ATI Restoration (216) 267-8330 Atlas Restoration Specialists, Inc. (314) 822-0090 Belfor (734) 261-7764 BELFOR Property Restoration (254) 939-1468 BELFOR Property Restoration (843) 767-0711 Belfor Usa (951) 682-7000 Belfor USA Group (206) 632-0800 BluSky Restoration Contractors (800) 266-5677 CREW Construction & Restoration (605) 965-2727 Damage Recovery Restoration (813) 733-8943 First Response (800) 909-5592 G.S. Jones Restoration Consulting (412) 866-1056 Kennedy Restoration (503) 234-0509 Midwest Remediation (317) 826-0940 Padgett's Cleaning & Restoration, Inc. (909) 307-2769 Protechs Inc. (260) 471-3165 PuroClean Restoration Services (605) 965-2727 SERVPRO of Leawood/ Overland Park (913) 381-6550 SERVPRO of South Austin,Pflugerville, North & East Williamson County (512) 301-7765 Stover's Restoration (316) 722-5005 Tobin Restoration Services of Idaho Falls (208) 523-1080 United Services (314) 298-2701 Vines Restoration Plumbing HVAC (843) 258-5677 Stallmann Construction Siding, Windows, & Doors (501) 455-4011

Environmental Engineering Technicians

Environmental engineering technicians engineering technicians carry out the plans that environmental engineers develop.

Environmental engineering technicians typically do the following:

  • Set up, test, operate, and modify equipment for preventing or cleaning up environmental pollution
  • Maintain project records and computer program files
  • Conduct pollution surveys, collecting and analyzing samples such as air and ground water
  • Perform indoor and outdoor environmental quality work
  • Work to mitigate sources of environmental pollution
  • Review technical documents to ensure completeness and conformance to requirements
  • Review work plans to schedule activities
  • Arrange for the disposal of lead, asbestos, and other hazardous materials

In laboratories, environmental engineering technicians record observations, test results, and document photographs. To keep the laboratory supplied, they also may get product information, identify vendors and suppliers, and order materials and equipment.

Environmental engineering technicians also help environmental engineers develop devices for cleaning up environmental pollution. They also inspect facilities for compliance with the regulations that govern substances such as asbestos, lead, and wastewater.


Drywall and Ceiling Tile Installers, and Tapers

Drywall and ceiling tile installers hang wallboards to walls and ceilings inside buildings. Tapers prepare the wallboards for painting, using tape and other materials. Many workers do both installing and taping.

Drywall installers typically do the following:

  • Review design plans to minimize the number of cuts and waste of wallboard
  • Measure the location of electrical outlets, plumbing, windows, and vents
  • Cut drywall to the right size, using utility knives and power saws
  • Fasten drywall panels to interior wall studs, using nails or screws
  • Trim and smooth rough edges so boards join evenly

Ceiling tile installers typically do the following:

  • Measure according to blueprints or drawings
  • Nail or screw supports
  • Put tiles or sheets of shock-absorbing materials on ceilings  
  • Keep the tile in place with cement adhesive, nails, or screws

Tapers typically do the following:

  • Prepare wall surface (wallboard) by patching nail holes
  • Apply tape and use sealing compound to cover joints between wallboards
  • Apply additional coats of sealing compound to create an even surface
  • Sand all joints and holes to a smooth, seamless finish

Installers are also called framers or hangers. Tapers are also called finishers. Ceiling tile installers are sometimes called acoustical carpenters because they work with tiles that block sound.

Once wallboards are hung, workers use increasingly wider trowels to spread multiple coats of spackle over cracks, indentations, and any remaining imperfections. Some workers may use a mechanical applicator, a tool that spreads sealing compound on the wall joint while dispensing and setting tape at the same time.

To work on ceilings, drywall and ceiling tile installers and tapers may use mechanical lifts or stand on stilts, ladders, or scaffolds.


Drywall and Ceiling Tile Installers, and Tapers

Drywall and ceiling tile installers hang wallboards to walls and ceilings inside buildings. Tapers prepare the wallboards for painting, using tape and other materials. Many workers do both installing and taping.

Drywall installers typically do the following:

  • Review design plans to minimize the number of cuts and waste of wallboard
  • Measure the location of electrical outlets, plumbing, windows, and vents
  • Cut drywall to the right size, using utility knives and power saws
  • Fasten drywall panels to interior wall studs, using nails or screws
  • Trim and smooth rough edges so boards join evenly

Ceiling tile installers typically do the following:

  • Measure according to blueprints or drawings
  • Nail or screw supports
  • Put tiles or sheets of shock-absorbing materials on ceilings  
  • Keep the tile in place with cement adhesive, nails, or screws

Tapers typically do the following:

  • Prepare wall surface (wallboard) by patching nail holes
  • Apply tape and use sealing compound to cover joints between wallboards
  • Apply additional coats of sealing compound to create an even surface
  • Sand all joints and holes to a smooth, seamless finish

Installers are also called framers or hangers. Tapers are also called finishers. Ceiling tile installers are sometimes called acoustical carpenters because they work with tiles that block sound.

Once wallboards are hung, workers use increasingly wider trowels to spread multiple coats of spackle over cracks, indentations, and any remaining imperfections. Some workers may use a mechanical applicator, a tool that spreads sealing compound on the wall joint while dispensing and setting tape at the same time.

To work on ceilings, drywall and ceiling tile installers and tapers may use mechanical lifts or stand on stilts, ladders, or scaffolds.


Hydrologists

Hydrologists study water and the water cycle. They study the movement, distribution, and other properties of water, and they analyze how these influence the surrounding environment. They use their expertise to solve problems concerning water quality and availability, for example.

Hydrologists typically do the following:

  • Measure the properties of bodies of water, such as volume and stream flow
  • Collect water and soil samples to test for certain properties, such as levels of pollution
  • Apply research findings to help minimize the environmental impacts of pollution, erosion, and other problems
  • Research ways to improve water conservation and preservation
  • Use computer models to forecast future water supplies, the spread of pollution, and other events
  • Evaluate the feasibility of water-related projects, such as hydroelectric power plants, irrigation systems, and waste treatment facilities
  • Prepare written reports and presentations of their findings

Hydrologists use remote sensing equipment to collect data. They or technicians whom they supervise usually install and maintain this equipment.

They also use sophisticated computer programs to analyze and model data. They use sophisticated laboratory equipment to analyze chemical samples collected in the field.

Hydrologists work closely with engineers, scientists, and public officials to study and manage the water supply. For example, they work with policy makers to develop water conservation plans and with biologists to monitor marine wildlife.

Most hydrologists specialize in a specific water source or a certain aspect of the water cycle, such as the evaporation of water from lakes and streams. Some of the most common specialties are:

Groundwater hydrologists study the water below the Earth's surface. They decide the best locations for wells and the amount of water that should be pumped. They are often consulted about the best places to build waste disposal sites to ensure that the waste does not contaminate the groundwater.

Hydrometeorologists study the relationship between surface waters and water in the atmosphere. For example, to predict and prepare for droughts, they study how much rain or snow a particular area gets and how that evaporates.

Surface water hydrologists study water from above ground sources such as streams, lakes, and snow packs. They may predict future water levels and usage to help reservoir managers decide when to release or store water. They also produce flood forecasts and help develop flood management plans.

Some people with a hydrology background become professors or teachers. For more information, see the profile on postsecondary teachers.


Carpenters

Carpenters construct and repair building frameworks and structures--such as stairways, doorframes, partitions, and rafters--made from wood and other materials. They also may install kitchen cabinets, siding, and drywall.

Carpenters typically do the following:

  • Follow blueprints and building plans to meet the needs of clients
  • Install structures and fixtures, such as windows and molding
  • Measure, cut, or shape wood, plastic, fiberglass, drywall, and other materials
  • Construct building frameworks, including wall studs, floor joists, and doorframes
  • Help put up, level, and install building framework with the aid of large pulleys and cranes
  • Inspect and replace damaged framework or other structures and fixtures
  • Instruct and direct laborers and other construction trade helpers

Carpenters are one of the most versatile construction occupations, with workers usually doing a variety of tasks. For example, some carpenters insulate office buildings; others install drywall or kitchen cabinets in homes. Those who help construct large buildings or bridges often make the wooden concrete forms for cement footings or pillars. Some carpenters build braces and scaffolding for buildings.

Carpenters use many different hand and power tools to cut and shape wood, plastic, fiberglass, or drywall. They commonly use handtools, including squares, levels, and chisels, as well as many power tools, such as sanders, circular saws, and nail guns. Carpenters put materials together with nails, screws, staples, and adhesives, and do a final check of their work to ensure accuracy. They use a tape measure on every project because proper measuring increases productivity, reduces waste, and ensures that the pieces being cut are the proper size.

The following are types of carpenters:

Residential carpenters typically specialize in new-home, townhome, and condominium building and remodeling. As part of a single job, they might build and set forms for footings, walls and slabs, and frame and finish exterior walls, roofs, and decks. They frame interior walls, build stairs, and install drywall, crown molding, doors, and kitchen cabinets. Highly-skilled carpenters may also tile floors and lay wood floors and carpet. Fully-trained construction carpenters are easily able to switch from new-home building to remodeling.

Commercial carpenters typically remodel and help build commercial office buildings, hospitals, hotels, schools, and shopping malls. Some specialize in working with light gauge and load-bearing steel framing for interior partitions, exterior framing, and curtain wall construction. Others specialize in working with concrete forming systems and finishing interior and exterior walls, partitions, and ceilings. Highly skilled carpenters can usually do many of the same tasks as residential carpenters.

Industrial carpenters typically work in civil and industrial settings where they put up scaffolding and build and set forms for pouring concrete. Some industrial carpenters build tunnel bracing or partitions in underground passageways and mines to control the circulation of air to worksites. Others build concrete forms for tunnels, bridges, dams, power plants, or sewer construction projects.


Drywall and Ceiling Tile Installers, and Tapers

Drywall and ceiling tile installers hang wallboards to walls and ceilings inside buildings. Tapers prepare the wallboards for painting, using tape and other materials. Many workers do both installing and taping.

Drywall installers typically do the following:

  • Review design plans to minimize the number of cuts and waste of wallboard
  • Measure the location of electrical outlets, plumbing, windows, and vents
  • Cut drywall to the right size, using utility knives and power saws
  • Fasten drywall panels to interior wall studs, using nails or screws
  • Trim and smooth rough edges so boards join evenly

Ceiling tile installers typically do the following:

  • Measure according to blueprints or drawings
  • Nail or screw supports
  • Put tiles or sheets of shock-absorbing materials on ceilings  
  • Keep the tile in place with cement adhesive, nails, or screws

Tapers typically do the following:

  • Prepare wall surface (wallboard) by patching nail holes
  • Apply tape and use sealing compound to cover joints between wallboards
  • Apply additional coats of sealing compound to create an even surface
  • Sand all joints and holes to a smooth, seamless finish

Installers are also called framers or hangers. Tapers are also called finishers. Ceiling tile installers are sometimes called acoustical carpenters because they work with tiles that block sound.

Once wallboards are hung, workers use increasingly wider trowels to spread multiple coats of spackle over cracks, indentations, and any remaining imperfections. Some workers may use a mechanical applicator, a tool that spreads sealing compound on the wall joint while dispensing and setting tape at the same time.

To work on ceilings, drywall and ceiling tile installers and tapers may use mechanical lifts or stand on stilts, ladders, or scaffolds.


Roofers

Roofers repair and install the roofs of buildings using a variety of materials, including shingles, asphalt, and metal.

Roofers typically do the following:

  • Inspect problem roofs to determine the best way to repair them
  • Measure roof to calculate the quantities of materials needed
  • Replace damaged or rotting joists or plywood
  • Install vapor barriers or layers of insulation
  • Install shingles, asphalt, metal, or other materials to make the roof watertight
  • Align roofing materials with edges of the roof
  • Cut roofing materials to fit angles formed by walls, vents, or intersecting roof surfaces
  • Cover exposed nail or screw heads with roofing cement or caulk to prevent leakage

Properly installed roofs keep water from leaking into buildings and damaging the interior, equipment, or furnishings.

There are two basic types of roofs, low-slope and steep-slope:

  • Low-slope: About two-thirds of all roofs are low-slope. Most commercial, industrial, and apartment buildings have low-slope roofs. Low-slope roofs rise 4 inches or less per horizontal foot and are installed in layers.

    For low-slope roofs, roofers typically use several layers of roofing materials or felt membranes stuck together with hot bitumen (a tar-like substance). They glaze the top layer to make a smooth surface or embed gravel in the hot bitumen to make a rough surface.

    An increasing number of low-slope roofs are covered with a single-ply membrane of waterproof rubber or thermoplastic compounds.
  • Steep-slope: Most of the remaining roofs are steep-slope. Most single-family houses have steep-slope roofs. Steep-slope roofs rise more than 4 inches per horizontal foot.

    For steep-slope roofs, roofers typically use asphalt shingles, which often cost less than other coverings. On steep-slope roofs, some roofers also install tile, solar shingles, fiberglass shingles, metal shingles, or shakes (rough wooden shingles).

    To apply shingles, roofers first lay, cut, and tack 3-foot strips of roofing over the entire roof. Then, starting from the bottom edge, they nail overlapping rows of shingles to the roof.

A small but increasing number of buildings now have “green” roofs that incorporate landscape roofing systems. A landscape roofing system typically begins with a single or multiple waterproof layers. After that layer is proven to be leak free, roofers put a root barrier over it, and, finally, layers of soil, in which vegetation is planted. Roofers must ensure that the roof is watertight and can endure the weight and water needs of the plants.


Painters, Construction and Maintenance

Painters apply paint, stain, and coatings to walls, buildings, bridges, and other structures.

Painters typically do the following:

  • Cover floors and furniture with drop-cloths and tarps to protect surfaces
  • Remove fixtures such as pictures, door knobs, or electric switch covers
  • Put up scaffolding and set up ladders
  • Fill holes and cracks with caulk, putty, plaster, or other compounds
  • Prepare surfaces by scraping, wire brushing, or sanding to a smooth finish
  • Calculate the area to be painted and the amount of paint needed
  • Apply primers or sealers so the paint will adhere
  • Choose and mix paints and stains to reach desired color and appearance
  • Apply paint or other finishes using hand brushes, rollers, or sprayers

Applying paint to interior walls makes surfaces attractive and vibrant. In addition, paints and other sealers protect exterior surfaces from erosion caused by exposure to the weather.

Because there are several ways to apply paint, workers must be able to choose the proper tool for each job, such as the correct roller, power sprayer, and the right size brush. Choosing the right tool typically depends on the surface to be covered and the characteristics of the finish.

A few painters--mainly industrial--must use special safety equipment. For example, painting in confined spaces such as the inside of a large storage tank, requires workers to wear self-contained suits to avoid inhaling toxic fumes. When painting bridges, tall buildings, or oil rigs, painters may work from scaffolding, bosun's chairs, and harnesses to reach work areas.

The following are examples of types of painters:  

Construction painters apply paints, stains, and coatings to interior and exterior walls, new buildings, and other structural surfaces.

Maintenance painters remove old finishes and apply paints, stains, and coatings later in a structure's life. Some painters specialize in painting or coating industrial structures, such as bridges and oil rigs, to prevent corrosion.

Artisan painters specialize in creating distinct finishes by using one of many decorative techniques. One technique is adding glaze for added depth and texture. Other common techniques may include sponging, distressing, rag-rolling, color blocking, and faux finishes. 

Painting and coating workers apply materials to manufactured products, such as furniture, toys and pottery, as well as transportation equipment including trucks, buses, boats, and airplanes. For more information about these painters, see the profile on painting and coating workers.


Heating, Air Conditioning, and Refrigeration Mechanics and Installers

Heating, air conditioning, and refrigeration mechanics and installers--often referred to as HVACR technicians--work on heating, ventilation, cooling, and refrigeration systems that control the air quality in many types of buildings.

Heating, air conditioning, and refrigeration mechanics and installers typically do the following:

  • Travel to worksites
  • Follow blueprints or other design specifications to install or repair HVACR systems
  • Connect systems to fuel and water supply lines, air ducts, and other components
  • Install electrical wiring and controls and test for proper operation
  • Inspect and maintain customers' HVACR systems
  • Test individual components to determine necessary repairs
  • Repair or replace worn or defective parts

Heating and air conditioning systems control the temperature, humidity, and overall air quality in homes, businesses, and other buildings. By providing a climate controlled environment, refrigeration systems make it possible to store and transport food, medicine, and other perishable items.

Although trained to do all three, HVACR technicians sometimes work strictly with heating, air conditioning, or refrigeration systems. They also may specialize in certain types of HVACR equipment, such as water-based heating systems, solar panels, or commercial refrigeration.

Depending on the task, HVACR technicians use many different tools. For example, they often use screwdrivers, wrenches, pipe cutters and other basic handtools when installing systems. To test or install complex system components, technicians may use more sophisticated tools, such as carbon monoxide testers, voltmeters, combustion analyzers, and acetylene torches.

When working on air conditioning and refrigeration systems, technicians must follow government regulations regarding the conservation, recovery, and recycling of refrigerants. This often entails proper handling and disposal of fluids.  

Some HVACR technicians sell service contracts to their clients, providing regular maintenance of heating and cooling systems.

Other craft workers sometimes help install or repair cooling and heating systems. For example, on a large air conditioning installation job, especially one in which workers are covered by union contracts, ductwork might be done by sheet metal workers and duct installers, or electrical work by electricians. In addition, home appliance repairers usually service window air conditioners and household refrigerators. For more information on these occupations, see the profiles on sheet metal workers, electricians, or home appliance repairers.


Construction Managers

Construction managers plan, coordinate, budget, and supervise construction projects from early development to completion.

Construction managers typically do the following:

  • Prepare and negotiate cost estimates, budgets, and work timetables
  • Select appropriate construction methods and strategies
  • Interpret and explain contracts and technical information to workers and other professionals
  • Report on work progress and budget matters to clients
  • Collaborate with architects, engineers, and other construction and building specialists
  • Instruct and supervise construction personnel and activities onsite
  • Respond to work delays and other problems and emergencies
  • Select, hire, and instruct laborers and subcontractors  
  • Comply with legal requirements, building and safety codes, and other regulations

Construction managers, often called general contractors or project managers, coordinate and supervise a wide variety of projects, including the building of all types of residential, commercial, and industrial structures, roads, bridges, powerplants, schools, and hospitals. They oversee specialized contractors and other personnel. Construction managers schedule and coordinate all design and construction processes to ensure a productive and safe work environment. They also make sure jobs are completed on time and on budget with the right amount of tools, equipment, and materials. Many managers also are responsible for obtaining necessary permits and licenses. They are often responsible for multiple projects at a time.

Construction managers work closely with other building specialists, such as architects, engineers, and a variety of trade workers, such as stonemasons, electricians, and carpenters. Projects may require specialists in everything from structural metalworking and painting, to landscaping, building roads, installing carpets, and excavating sites. Depending on the project, construction managers also may interact with lawyers and local government officials. For example, when working on city-owned property or municipal buildings, managers sometimes confer with city council members to ensure that all regulations are met.

For projects too large to be managed by one person, such as office buildings and industrial complexes, a construction manager would only be in charge of one part of the project. Each construction manager would oversee a specific construction phase and choose subcontractors to complete it. Construction managers may need to collaborate and coordinate with other construction managers who are responsible for different aspects of the project.

To maximize efficiency and productivity, construction managers often use specialized cost-estimating and planning software to effectively budget the time and money required to complete specific projects. Many managers also use software to determine the best way to get materials to the building site. For more information, see the profile on cost estimators.


Construction Laborers and Helpers

Construction laborers and helpers do many basic tasks that require physical labor on construction sites.

Construction laborers and helpers typically do the following:

  • Clean and prepare construction sites by removing debris and possible hazards
  • Load or unload building materials to be used in construction
  • Build or take apart bracing, barricades, forms (molds that determine the shape of concrete), scaffolding, and temporary structures
  • Dig trenches, backfill holes, or compact earth to prepare for construction
  • Operate or tend equipment and machines used in construction, such as concrete mixers
  • Help other craftworkers with their duties
  • Follow construction plans and instructions from the people they are working for

Construction laborers and helpers work on almost all construction sites, doing a wide range of tasks from the very easy to the extremely difficult and hazardous. Although many of the tasks they do require some training and experience, most jobs usually require little skill and can be learned quickly. 

The following are occupational specialties:

Construction laborers do a variety of construction-related activities during all phases of construction. Although most laborers are generalists--such as those who install barricades, cones, and markers to control traffic patterns--many others specialize. For example, those who operate the machines and equipment that lay concrete or asphalt on roads are more likely to specialize in those areas.

Most construction laborers work in the following areas:

  • Building homes and businesses
  • Tearing down buildings
  • Removing hazardous materials
  • Building highways and roads
  • Digging tunnels and mine shafts

Construction laborers use a variety of tools and equipment. Some tools are simple, such as brooms and shovels; other equipment is more sophisticated, such as pavement breakers, jackhammers, earth tampers, and surveying equipment.

With special training, laborers may help transport and use explosives or run hydraulic boring machines to dig out tunnels. They may learn to use laser beam equipment to place pipes and use computers to control robotic pipe cutters. They may become certified to remove asbestos, lead, or chemicals.

Helpers assist construction craftworkers, such as electricians and carpenters, with a variety of basic tasks. They may carry tools and materials or help set up equipment. For example, many helpers work with cement masons to move and set forms. Many other helpers assist with taking apart equipment, cleaning up sites, and disposing of waste, as well as helping with any other needs of craftworkers.

Many construction trades have helpers who assist craftworkers. The following are examples of trades that have associated helpers:

  • Brickmasons, blockmasons, stonemasons, and tile and marble setters
  • Carpenters
  • Electricians
  • Painters, paperhangers, plasterers, and stucco masons
  • Pipelayers, plumbers, pipefitters, and steamfitters
  • Roofers

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