Meenaghan Brian

(206) 223-6274

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Address Found 1420 5th Ave, Seattle, WA 98101
Territories Found King, WA
Matching Address Burns Simmons (206) 224-8787 Free Estimatesn Plumbing (206) 548-4333 Gangnes, Larry S, ATY (206) 223-7036 Lane Powell PC (206) 223-7000 Swanson, Paul D, ATY (206) 223-7391 Aaron A Roblan (206) 626-6402 Albert M. Raines PLLC (206) 274-5315 Anderson Kimberly R (206) 903-8803 Andrew Gabel (206) 223-7026 Andrew Yates (206) 223-7034 Asplund Mark (206) 223-2542 Bacio (206) 622-2889 Bailey Troy T (206) 903-8707 Barbara Duffy (206) 223-7944 Bart E Bartholdt (206) 340-9647 Beau Bangles (206) 682-4434 Beck Stanton (206) 223-1344 Benjamin J Roesch (206) 223-7383 Brent Nourse (206) 223-7963 Brown Michael J (206) 903-8811 Burnett Alan (206) 223-7108 Burton Kenneth C Law Offices Of (206) 623-2468 Butler Diane (206) 223-7715 Callison Architecture Inc (206) 623-5144 Carnell Eric (206) 223-7401 Charles R Wolfe Attorney At Law (206) 274-5145 Chism Jacobson & Johnson PLLC (206) 689-5650 Christensen O'Connor Johnson & Kindness (206) 682-5463 Christopher J Barry (206) 903-8815 Clinton Richard M (206) 903-8851 Contractors Services INC (206) 613-4410 Conybeare-Britton Brigid (206) 903-8808 CURT Roy Hineline (206) 903-8853 D Michael Reilly (206) 223-7051 David M Jacobson (206) 903-8864 David R Goodnight (206) 903-8859 Dawn Spratley (206) 223-7274 Dawson Russell H Attorney at Law (206) 623-2470 Defoe Brian B (206) 223-7948 Donlan Dan (206) 223-7048 Duvall Gary R (206) 340-9668 Duvlin Lisa N (206) 626-6409 Emory Meade (206) 223-3988 Fairchild Todd S (206) 903-8880 Ferrell George A (206) 903-8845 Fields Michael R (206) 626-6403 Flannery Jo (206) 223-7956 Fleming Michael (206) 223-7149 Foster Joanne (206) 621-0089 Frothingham Beth A (206) 903-8819 Gallup Nancy L (206) 903-8826 Gartner Gabe B (206) 903-8834 Gross & Ursich (206) 622-1177 Harrison Jennifer (206) 223-6252 Hedeen & Caditz Law Offices Of (206) 689-8970 Hermsen James R (206) 903-8852 Holland Bryce I (206) 903-8854 Hollinrake John D (206) 903-8812 Hungate Dan P (206) 903-8846 Irwin L Treiger (206) 903-8705 Jackson June (206) 223-7432 JAD & Associates (206) 274-5110 Jahnke Susan (206) 223-6259 James D Clack (206) 903-8875 Jeffrey M ODOM (206) 223-7093 Jensen Steven (206) 223-7732 John H Ridge (206) 903-8827 Johnsrud Barry A (206) 626-6411 Johnston Scot J (206) 903-8813 Joseph P CORR (206) 223-7433 Kaplan Robert D (206) 903-8810 Katherine Baker (206) 223-7434 Kay S Slonim (206) 223-7273 Kellogg Ken (206) 223-7054 Kenneth G Sam (206) 903-8804 Klein Joseph C (206) 903-8862 Krause William (206) 223-7397 Ladd Carolyn H (206) 626-6401 Lapin Michael E (206) 340-9634 Larson Ronda (206) 223-7964 Latimer Matthew D (206) 903-8821 Latsinova Rita V (206) 903-8882 Laurie L Johnston (206) 626-6408 Law Offices Of Judith Ramseyer (206) 274-5167 Lewington Mark C (206) 340-9687 Lewis & Munday A Professional Corporation (206) 625-0550 Loren Armstrong (206) 903-5432 Lukins Kyle B (206) 903-8816 Macario Matthew (206) 223-7744 Macleod Jon W PS (206) 689-5626 Manning Joseph (206) 224-7609 Mark Edwin Johnson (206) 223-7052 Marzetti Christopher (206) 223-7933 McCarthy Paul (206) 223-7081 Meyers Kimberly (206) 223-3984 Michede A Wong (206) 223-7739 Mitchell Richard E (206) 903-8881 Narodick Kit (206) 223-7431 Nelson Kathleen (206) 223-7268 O'Bara Marianne (206) 903-8843 Osborne Samuel S (206) 903-8818 Paige Davis (206) 223-7137 Parker Services (206) 223-8227 Petrich Annmarie (206) 223-7267 Pop A Locksmith (206) 801-6771 Pricewaterhousecoopers LLP (206) 398-3000 Priya Sinha Cloutier (206) 223-7022 Quality Infosystems (206) 274-5164 Randal R Jones (206) 903-8814 Randall L Price (206) 903-5434 Regina Vogel Culbert (206) 223-7433 Renee Grant Bluechel (206) 223-7436 Rickards Glenn P (206) 903-8863 Robert H Fulton (206) 223-7095 Robert W Kosin (206) 626-6418 Rosse Sharon L (206) 340-9646 Runkel Matthew W (206) 903-8822 Runnette Deirdre L (206) 340-9609 Schwab Evan L (206) 903-8858 Schwensen Joyce S (206) 903-4833 Seattle Debt Law (206) 224-3176 Selberg Barbara J (206) 722-1272 Selby Group Inc (206) 224-3550 Sommermeyer Brett (206) 223-7963 Steere Paul W (206) 903-8710 Steichen Randall R (206) 903-8857 Steven B Winters (206) 223-7740 Thomas Deirdre C (206) 903-8806 Thuy Nguyen Leeper (206) 903-5462 Timothy D Wackerbarth (206) 223-7960 Timothy W Jones (206) 223-7275 Vaughn Daniel (206) 223-7943 W Scott Wert (206) 903-8817 Wacker Herman (206) 224-5626 Wayne W Hansen (206) 626-6400 Weinstein Brian (206) 346-2352 Weinstein Brian PS (206) 346-2356 Whittemore Collection II (206) 583-8339 Yana D Koubourlis (206) 903-8861 Yana Hirata (206) 340-8764 Young David (206) 223-7749 Zeringer Brian (206) 223-7073 Zubel Eric Attorney (206) 613-4433

Judges, Mediators, and Hearing Officers

Judges, mediators, and hearing officers apply the law to court cases and oversee the legal process in courts. They also resolve administrative disputes and facilitate negotiations between opposing parties.

Judges, mediators, and hearing officers typically do the following:

  • Research legal issues
  • Read and evaluate information from documents such as motions, claim applications, or records
  • Preside over hearings and listen to or read arguments by opposing parties
  • Determine if the information presented supports the charge, claim, or dispute
  • Decide if the procedure is being conducted according to the rules and law
  • Analyze, research, and apply laws, regulations, or precedents to reach judgments, conclusions, or agreements
  • Write opinions, decisions, or instructions regarding the case, claim, or dispute

Judges commonly preside over trials or hearings of cases regarding nearly every aspect of society, from individual traffic offenses to issues concerning the rights of large corporations. Judges listen to arguments and determine whether the evidence presented deserves a trial. In criminal cases, judges may decide that people charged with crimes should be held in jail until the trial, or they may set conditions for their release. They also approve search and arrest warrants.

Judges interpret the law to determine how a trial will proceed, which is particularly important when unusual circumstances arise for which standard procedures have not been established. They ensure that hearings and trials are conducted fairly and the legal rights of all involved parties are protected.

In trials in which juries are selected to decide the case, judges instruct jurors on applicable laws and direct them to consider the facts from the evidence. For other trials, judges decide the case. A judge who determines guilt in criminal cases may impose a sentence or penalty on the guilty party. In civil cases, the judge may award relief, such as compensation for damages, to the parties who win the lawsuit.

Some judges, such as appellate court judges, review decisions and records made by lower courts, and make decisions based on lawyers' written and oral arguments.

Judges use various forms of technology, such as electronic databases and software, to manage cases and prepare for trials. In some cases, a judge also may manage the court's administrative and clerical staff.

The following are examples of types of judges, mediators, and hearing officers:

Judges, magistrate judges, and magistrates preside over trials or hearings. They typically work in local, state, and federal courts.

In local and state court systems, they have a variety of titles, such as municipal court judge, county court judge, magistrate, and justice of the peace. Traffic violations, misdemeanors, small-claims cases, and pretrial hearings make up the bulk of these judges' work.

In federal and state court systems, general trial court judges have authority over any case in their system. Appellate court judges rule on a small number of cases by reviewing decisions of the lower courts and lawyers' written and oral arguments.

Hearing officers, also known as administrative law judges or adjudicators, usually work for government agencies. They decide many issues, such as if a person is eligible for workers' compensation benefits, or if employment discrimination occurred.

Arbitrators, mediators, or conciliators help opposing parties settle disputes outside of court. They hold private, confidential hearings, which are less formal than a court trial.  

Arbitrators are usually attorneys or business people with expertise in a particular field. They hear and decide disputes between opposing parties as an impartial third party. When arbitration is required, if one side is not happy with the decision, they can still take the matter to court. Arbitration may also be voluntary, in which the opposing sides agree that whatever the arbitrator decides will be a final, binding decision.

Mediators are neutral parties who help people resolve their disputes. Mediators suggest solutions, but they do not make binding decisions. If the opposing sides cannot reach a settlement with the mediator's help, they are free to pursue other options.

Conciliators are similar to mediators. Their role is to help guide opposing sides to a settlement. The opposing sides must decide in advance if they will be bound by the conciliator's recommendations.


Lawyers

Lawyers advise and represent individuals, businesses, or government agencies on legal issues or disputes. 

Lawyers typically do the following:

  • Advise and represent clients in courts, before government agencies, or in private legal matters
  • Communicate with their clients and others
  • Conduct research and analysis of legal problems
  • Interpret laws, rulings, and regulations for individuals and businesses
  • Present facts in writing or verbally to their clients or others and argue on their behalf
  • Prepare and file legal documents, such as lawsuits, appeals, wills, contracts, and deeds

Lawyers, also called attorneys, act as both advocates and advisors.

As advocates, they represent one of the parties in criminal and civil trials by presenting evidence and arguing in court to support their client.

As advisors, lawyers counsel their clients about their legal rights and obligations and suggest courses of action in business and personal matters. All attorneys research the intent of laws and judicial decisions and apply the laws to the specific circumstances that their clients face. 

To prepare for cases more efficiently, lawyers increasingly use the Internet, online legal databases, and virtual law libraries. Lawyers also often oversee the work of support staff, such as paralegals and legal assistants. For more information about legal support staff, see the profile on paralegals and legal assistants.

Lawyers may have different titles and different duties, depending on where they work.

Criminal law attorneys are also known as prosecutors or defense attorneys. Prosecutors work for the government to file a lawsuit, or charge, against an individual or corporation accused of violating the law.

Defense attorneys work for either individuals or the government (as public defenders) to represent, or defend, the accused.

Government counsels commonly work in government agencies. They write and interpret laws and regulations and set up procedures to enforce them. Government counsels also write legal reviews on agencies' decisions. They argue civil and criminal cases on behalf of the government.

Corporate counsels, also called in-house counsels, are lawyers who work for corporations. They advise a corporation's executives about legal issues related to the corporation's business activities. These issues might involve patents, government regulations, contracts with other companies, property interests, taxes, or collective-bargaining agreements with unions.

Legal aid lawyers work for private, nonprofit organizations for disadvantaged people. They generally handle civil cases, such as those about leases, job discrimination, and wage disputes, rather than criminal cases.

Lawyers often specialize in a particular area. The following are some examples of types of lawyers:

Environmental lawyers deal with issues and regulations that are related to the environment. They might represent advocacy groups, waste disposal companies, or government agencies to make sure they comply with the relevant laws.

Tax lawyers handle a variety of tax-related issues for individuals and corporations. Tax lawyers may help clients navigate complex tax regulations so that they pay the appropriate tax on income, profits, property, and so on. For example, they might advise a corporation on how much tax it needs to pay from profits made in different states to comply with the Internal Revenue Service's (IRS) rules.

Intellectual property lawyers deal with the laws related to inventions, patents, trademarks, and creative works such as music, books, and movies. An intellectual property lawyer might advise a client about whether it is okay to use published material in the client's forthcoming book.

Family lawyers handle a variety of legal issues that pertain to the family. They may advise clients regarding divorce, child custody, and adoption proceedings.

Securities lawyers work on legal issues arising from the buying and sell of stocks, ensuring that all disclosure requirements are met. They may advise corporations that are interested in listing in the stock exchange through an initial public offering (IPO) or buying shares in another corporation.

Litigation lawyers handle all lawsuits and disputes between parties. These could be contract disputes, personal injury disputes, or real estate and property disputes. Litigation lawyers may specialize in a certain area, such as personal injury law, or may be a general lawyer for all types of disputes and lawsuits.

Some attorneys become teachers in law schools. For more information on law school professors, see the profile on postsecondary teachers.


Judges, Mediators, and Hearing Officers

Judges, mediators, and hearing officers apply the law to court cases and oversee the legal process in courts. They also resolve administrative disputes and facilitate negotiations between opposing parties.

Judges, mediators, and hearing officers typically do the following:

  • Research legal issues
  • Read and evaluate information from documents such as motions, claim applications, or records
  • Preside over hearings and listen to or read arguments by opposing parties
  • Determine if the information presented supports the charge, claim, or dispute
  • Decide if the procedure is being conducted according to the rules and law
  • Analyze, research, and apply laws, regulations, or precedents to reach judgments, conclusions, or agreements
  • Write opinions, decisions, or instructions regarding the case, claim, or dispute

Judges commonly preside over trials or hearings of cases regarding nearly every aspect of society, from individual traffic offenses to issues concerning the rights of large corporations. Judges listen to arguments and determine whether the evidence presented deserves a trial. In criminal cases, judges may decide that people charged with crimes should be held in jail until the trial, or they may set conditions for their release. They also approve search and arrest warrants.

Judges interpret the law to determine how a trial will proceed, which is particularly important when unusual circumstances arise for which standard procedures have not been established. They ensure that hearings and trials are conducted fairly and the legal rights of all involved parties are protected.

In trials in which juries are selected to decide the case, judges instruct jurors on applicable laws and direct them to consider the facts from the evidence. For other trials, judges decide the case. A judge who determines guilt in criminal cases may impose a sentence or penalty on the guilty party. In civil cases, the judge may award relief, such as compensation for damages, to the parties who win the lawsuit.

Some judges, such as appellate court judges, review decisions and records made by lower courts, and make decisions based on lawyers' written and oral arguments.

Judges use various forms of technology, such as electronic databases and software, to manage cases and prepare for trials. In some cases, a judge also may manage the court's administrative and clerical staff.

The following are examples of types of judges, mediators, and hearing officers:

Judges, magistrate judges, and magistrates preside over trials or hearings. They typically work in local, state, and federal courts.

In local and state court systems, they have a variety of titles, such as municipal court judge, county court judge, magistrate, and justice of the peace. Traffic violations, misdemeanors, small-claims cases, and pretrial hearings make up the bulk of these judges' work.

In federal and state court systems, general trial court judges have authority over any case in their system. Appellate court judges rule on a small number of cases by reviewing decisions of the lower courts and lawyers' written and oral arguments.

Hearing officers, also known as administrative law judges or adjudicators, usually work for government agencies. They decide many issues, such as if a person is eligible for workers' compensation benefits, or if employment discrimination occurred.

Arbitrators, mediators, or conciliators help opposing parties settle disputes outside of court. They hold private, confidential hearings, which are less formal than a court trial.  

Arbitrators are usually attorneys or business people with expertise in a particular field. They hear and decide disputes between opposing parties as an impartial third party. When arbitration is required, if one side is not happy with the decision, they can still take the matter to court. Arbitration may also be voluntary, in which the opposing sides agree that whatever the arbitrator decides will be a final, binding decision.

Mediators are neutral parties who help people resolve their disputes. Mediators suggest solutions, but they do not make binding decisions. If the opposing sides cannot reach a settlement with the mediator's help, they are free to pursue other options.

Conciliators are similar to mediators. Their role is to help guide opposing sides to a settlement. The opposing sides must decide in advance if they will be bound by the conciliator's recommendations.


Lawyers

Lawyers advise and represent individuals, businesses, or government agencies on legal issues or disputes. 

Lawyers typically do the following:

  • Advise and represent clients in courts, before government agencies, or in private legal matters
  • Communicate with their clients and others
  • Conduct research and analysis of legal problems
  • Interpret laws, rulings, and regulations for individuals and businesses
  • Present facts in writing or verbally to their clients or others and argue on their behalf
  • Prepare and file legal documents, such as lawsuits, appeals, wills, contracts, and deeds

Lawyers, also called attorneys, act as both advocates and advisors.

As advocates, they represent one of the parties in criminal and civil trials by presenting evidence and arguing in court to support their client.

As advisors, lawyers counsel their clients about their legal rights and obligations and suggest courses of action in business and personal matters. All attorneys research the intent of laws and judicial decisions and apply the laws to the specific circumstances that their clients face. 

To prepare for cases more efficiently, lawyers increasingly use the Internet, online legal databases, and virtual law libraries. Lawyers also often oversee the work of support staff, such as paralegals and legal assistants. For more information about legal support staff, see the profile on paralegals and legal assistants.

Lawyers may have different titles and different duties, depending on where they work.

Criminal law attorneys are also known as prosecutors or defense attorneys. Prosecutors work for the government to file a lawsuit, or charge, against an individual or corporation accused of violating the law.

Defense attorneys work for either individuals or the government (as public defenders) to represent, or defend, the accused.

Government counsels commonly work in government agencies. They write and interpret laws and regulations and set up procedures to enforce them. Government counsels also write legal reviews on agencies' decisions. They argue civil and criminal cases on behalf of the government.

Corporate counsels, also called in-house counsels, are lawyers who work for corporations. They advise a corporation's executives about legal issues related to the corporation's business activities. These issues might involve patents, government regulations, contracts with other companies, property interests, taxes, or collective-bargaining agreements with unions.

Legal aid lawyers work for private, nonprofit organizations for disadvantaged people. They generally handle civil cases, such as those about leases, job discrimination, and wage disputes, rather than criminal cases.

Lawyers often specialize in a particular area. The following are some examples of types of lawyers:

Environmental lawyers deal with issues and regulations that are related to the environment. They might represent advocacy groups, waste disposal companies, or government agencies to make sure they comply with the relevant laws.

Tax lawyers handle a variety of tax-related issues for individuals and corporations. Tax lawyers may help clients navigate complex tax regulations so that they pay the appropriate tax on income, profits, property, and so on. For example, they might advise a corporation on how much tax it needs to pay from profits made in different states to comply with the Internal Revenue Service's (IRS) rules.

Intellectual property lawyers deal with the laws related to inventions, patents, trademarks, and creative works such as music, books, and movies. An intellectual property lawyer might advise a client about whether it is okay to use published material in the client's forthcoming book.

Family lawyers handle a variety of legal issues that pertain to the family. They may advise clients regarding divorce, child custody, and adoption proceedings.

Securities lawyers work on legal issues arising from the buying and sell of stocks, ensuring that all disclosure requirements are met. They may advise corporations that are interested in listing in the stock exchange through an initial public offering (IPO) or buying shares in another corporation.

Litigation lawyers handle all lawsuits and disputes between parties. These could be contract disputes, personal injury disputes, or real estate and property disputes. Litigation lawyers may specialize in a certain area, such as personal injury law, or may be a general lawyer for all types of disputes and lawsuits.

Some attorneys become teachers in law schools. For more information on law school professors, see the profile on postsecondary teachers.


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